Movie Review: “It Might Get Loud”

Maybe we don't notice the axe men because the lead singers hog the spotlight; actually, that's almost certainly the case. But that's tragic, because the guitarists are often the most interesting guys in a band. Or, as Jason Lee's lead singer character says in Almost Famous: "From the very beginning, we said I'm the front man, and you're the guitarist with mystique. That's the dynamic we agreed on!" Read more [...]

The Man Who Couldn’t Cry (At Movies) Meets His Match

To call Hachi a "tearjerker" is not quite correct. Hachi will jerk tears out of you, sure. But Hachi will also haunt your emotions. Hachi will punch your heart in the balls. Hachi will grab your tear tear ducts, hold a gun to their heads, and blindfold them in the bank safe, holding them hostage until the police meet its demands --namely: a helicopter; a million dollars in unmarked, nonconsecutive bills; and a single tear to trickle down every viewer's cheek. Read more [...]

Life of Piscine, Tag-Team!

This two-person review of "Life of Pi" will take you back to the good ol' days of the World Wrestling Federation. Sitzman already called that he was Ultimate Warrior, but it's yet to be determined who Deuce will be. Hulk Hogan? André the Giant? Jake the Snake? Only one way to find out--read on! Read more [...]

Bill Hicks

Bill Hicks was a comedian from Texas who rose to at prominence in the 80s. He was "controversial," in that he talked a lot about politics, society, and drugs. He unleashed his wrath on the first two, and as for drugs, he was a major opponent of the hypocrisy surrounding drugs. Although his comedy could be angry, bitter, and often vulgar, he still strangely seemed to come at the whole thing from a place of love and compassion (hence the book's title). His comedy seemed to reflect an exasperation at the decline of society, but he seemed to genuinely want to change things for the better. Read more [...]

Djake Exploits The Attic: Nightmare City (1980)

This week on Djake Exploits the Attic, I'm going to review the 1980 Italian "infected people" (don't call them zombies) gorefest, Nightmare City. Directed by Umberto Lenzi, infamously known for his Cannibal Holocaust rip-off, Cannibal Ferox (aka Make Them Die Slowly), and starring Hugo Stiglitz ("everyone in the German Army has heard of Hugo Stiglitz"), a Mexican actor who moved to Italy in the 70s to make exploitation flicks. The story is fairly simple: a military plane carrying a famous scientist Read more [...]